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Teyfur was the first reporter to enter Eritrea accompanied by its rebels, crossing, under the veil of night, the hills forming the border between Eastern Sudan and western Eritrea at the Hafera region, neighboring the town of Kessela.

He returned back to write elegant reportages supported by photographs snapped and frozen in testimony of an experienced and scrutinizing eye.

In hindsight, it seems that it is an undeniable fact that the adventurous journey of Ahmed Tayfur to Eritrea was the hammer which singlehandedly brought down the siege of silence which was surrounding the Eritrean struggle, and indeed it was the hand which forced the doors open to the Eritrean rebels, to defeat the Ethiopian Empire’s persevering hard work in painting them as bandits and shifta gangs who prey on peaceful passengers, travelers and commercial convoys.

Ahmed Teyfur’s life was terminated in 1966, long before his actual death from thirst and hunger, three decades later.But Teyfur’s destiny had to be dying in a cheap shelter- room at a poor neighborhood of Cairo, where some comates extended their magnanimity and kindness in spite of what they endured from him, and shipped his worn out, alcohol-consumed body to rest among his folks, in a soil he was coerced to betray, and where his soul may find peace and absolution.Ahmed Teyfur’s story sounds as if it were a modern Sudanese replica of an excruciating Greek tragedy which the successive events of its chapters took place in the Sudan of the sixties.He escaped straying and roving the deserts of North Sudan, trying, in a moment of desperation, to leave the country heading for Egypt, where he may have hoped, to melt away in the human waves of Cairo, forget himself and be forgotten in a village or a town of that country.He may also had hopes of taking refuge in a saint’s remote sanctuary where his sins may be forgiven, or in an oasis, which, in the olden times, might have been a prison for some rebels one day and their retreat at another.

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